Mental Health News Round-Up: July 8

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U.S. House of Representatives Passes Mental Health Bill

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On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that would seek mental health reform across the country. Among other things, the bill would implement direct funding for mental health illnesses, reorder the structure of the federal agency of mental health, and develop requirements for private insurers to cover mental health care.

How Racism Affects Mental Health — & What We Can Do About It

With July being Minority Mental Health Month (MMHM), it is important to understand the effects of prejudice and racism on minority communities. Forms of racism have reportedly shown an effect on depression, anxiety and stress. Addressing disparities and making sure everyone receives proper mental health care can help us take control of our own lives.

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Emerging Scholars Fellowship: Asian American Men’s Experience of Gendered Racism

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Tao is a researcher in the 2016 class of the Emerging Scholars Fellowship. Read blog updates from Tao and her fellow scholars here.

tao liu_squareIt is hard to believe that my project is coming to an end! Doing a project is like raising a baby, you struggle with it and enjoy it at the same time, and have to appropriately let to it go at the end. In this blog, I will briefly talk about findings of my study.

As I introduced before, I collected data through an online survey. My aim of data collection was at least 500 to ensure enough statistical power for my factor analyses. Through over 5 month’s work and with the assistance of professors, bloggers, website managers, and administrative staff in universities, I collected over 1,000 responses through Qualtrics. Even after cleaning the “dirty” data, there was enough to conduct my analysis. I will talk about the tips of online data collection in another blog post.

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Emerging Scholars Fellowship: Learning More about Asian American History

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Tao is a researcher in the 2016 class of the Emerging Scholars Fellowship. Read blog updates from Tao and her fellow scholars here.

angry asian man figureA couple of weeks ago, I attended the Asian Americans Conference at Indiana University. The keynote speaker was Phil Yu, the founder of one of the earliest and most popular Asian American blogs, Angry Asian Man.

I imagined many times how angry the blogger would be, but to my surprise, he is not an angry guy, and actually he is very calm and nice. In his speech, I learned how he started the blog as a way of voicing the issues that Asian Americans have to face in the U.S., and how he fights for the rights of Asian Americans, based on the privileges that previous Asian Americans have fought for him. Continue Reading

When Masculinity and Racism Collide: Meet Tao Liu’s Mentor Dr. Christopher Liang

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Tao is a researcher in the 2016 class of the Emerging Scholars Fellowship. Read blog updates from Tao and her fellow scholars here.

When I talk about racism against Asian American men with my friends, some reactions I got was “Seriously? This is U.S.” Among those who have awareness of racism, it is hard for them to connect racism and gender together. However, when they start talking about difficulties with finding dating partners, they know what I am talking about.

There are not many scholars researching the intersection of racism and masculinity, especially for Asian American men. Luckily, Dr. Chris Liang, one of the few scholars focusing on this research area, agreed to be my National Mentor.

tao mentorDr. Christopher Liang is a former President of the Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity. His research interests center on how perceived racism and masculinity ideologies are associated with the academic, psychological, and physiological health, and health-related behaviors of ethnic minority boys and men. As he said in our conversations, he intends to use research to make positive impacts on communities. He is not a scholar who only lives in the ivory tower, rather, he regards research as a means for intervention on multiple levels.

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