Kognito – Active Minds Blog http://activemindsblog.org Changing the conversation about mental health Wed, 21 Dec 2016 21:09:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.1 Announcing the Winners of the Kognito Challenge! http://activemindsblog.org/announcing-the-winners-of-the-kognito-challenge-2/ Tue, 11 Oct 2016 16:08:14 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=5720 00002

Congratulations to the entire Active Minds chapter network for stepping up to the Kognito Challenge! Together, 97 participating schools reached more than 3,000 people in just four weeks via Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which was available for free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until Sunday, October 9.

Now that the competition has come to an end, it’s time to announce the winners!

20 schools completed the full Challenge, each training at least 50 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. Each of those schools (see schools in bold type on the official Challenge Leaderboard) earned a $250 credit toward their annual national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

The following three schools trained THE MOST people overall and have earned an additional fundraising credit:

  • The University of Texas at San Antonio trained 286 people.
  • Saint Cloud State University (Saint Cloud, MN) trained 222 people.
  • Stockton University (Pomona, NJ) trained 212 people.

“We already sense a difference in the campus climate towards mental health,” said UT San Antonio Chapter President Melina Acosta. “At least four instructors with multiple classes of 100+ offered extra credit to students who completed the challenge. We were also very plugged into the Student Government Association, so we were able to share the challenge with more student leaders on campus this go-around. Overall, networking with students and faculty and incentivizing the challenge really seemed to pay off.”

Remarkably, the top three schools represent a diverse range in terms of the total number of students enrolled, and school size did not seem to impact the results of the competition. Active Minds at Stockton University alone reached more than 2.5% of their campus through the Challenge!

Each of the top ten schools trained more than 90 people each on their campuses. Those schools include:

  • Northeastern University (Boston, MA) – trained 191 people
  • University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA) – trained 171 people
  • University of North Carolina at Asheville – trained 121 people
  • Austin Peay State University (Clarksville, TN) – trained 118 people
  • University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL) – trained 118 people
  • Coppin State University (Baltimore, MD) – trained 98 people
  • University of Memphis (Memphis, TN) – trained 94 people

Active Minds chapters had a great time participating in the Challenge and reported incredible impact on their campuses.

“We have loved this challenge! It fit perfectly into our Suicide Prevention efforts,” said Nathan Morell, Active Minds staff advisor at Stockton University. “We made it a mandatory part of our depression screener training as well as (with support from res life) had most of our RA’s take it.”

Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, TN, home to many military families stationed or retired from Fort Campbell, KY, also reported great success.

“Our veterans, reserve, national guard, ROTC, and Active Duty students enjoyed the Kognito Challenge and gained at of understanding and education from it,” said Chapter President Lauren Schores. “We networked [with] psychology, sociology, social work, and pre-professional health students.  We also spoke with peer mentoring, housing, disability services, and student life and engagement.”

Participants in the course completed a pre- and post-survey indicating their readiness to help a friend in distress. Percentage changes in the survey data will be provided to each school with at least 50 participants.

How to Earn a Second Fundraising Reward

Schools can now receive a second fundraising incentive by helping their school
leadership implement Kognito’s At-Risk simulations campus-wide. As an on-campus leader for mental health, you’re in a strong position to help your school understand the benefits and impact of Kognito’s At-Risk simulations as a frontline solution for improving emotional health..

Any chapter who successfully approaches their campus administration and gets them
to request a written pricing proposal for their school will receive an additional
award toward their chapter fundraising goal.

We will be talking to you more about how to earn this incentive in the coming weeks. In the meantime, please do not hesitate to reach out to Kognito at info@kognito.com. We are excited to host Kognito as a sponsor at the national conference in November and we look forward to seeing you there.

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KOGNITO CHALLENGE UPDATE: SAVE LIVES AND RAISE FUNDS FOR MENTAL HEALTH http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-update-save-lives-and-raise-funds-for-mental-health-2/ Mon, 19 Sep 2016 14:46:24 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=5539 00002

We’re two weeks into the Fall 2016 Kognito Challenge, and we are already seeing amazing results!

Overall, 65 schools have reached more than 600 students via Kognito’s At Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which is free to all schools with Active Minds chapters through October 7. The online, interactive experience teaches participants how to identify and assist students in distress.

This is the second Kognito Challenge. Collectively, Active Minds chapters have engaged more than 4,000 participants since the first Kognito Challenge in spring 2016.

As of the time this post was written, Austin Peay State University, Saint Cloud State University, and Stockton University, have completed and are leading the Challenge, each training more than 55 students, faculty, and staff. The first 40 chapters to engage at least 50 students and 1 faculty or staff member to complete the full simulation will receive $250 credit toward their national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

There’s still plenty of time to join in and compete to win! Here are a few creative approaches chapter members have taken to encourage participation:

Take pictures of students completing the simulation.

Pictures are worth 1,000 words. Take pictures of people completing the challenge and post on social media.

Promote the Challenge on social media.

Build an army one step at a time. Gather a team of a few people to help you spread the word. Or, ask one person to tell a friend, to tell a friend, to tell a friend. Active Minds at Austin Peay State University, University of Texas at San Antonio, and others have tapped into their social media networks to spread the word via social media for the Challenge.3

Use school resources.

Several schools have sent the Kognito simulation link to their campus listservs, inviting all students, staff, and faculty to complete the course. Talk to your school newspaper, radio station, social media team and announcers at sporting events about helping you promote the challenge.

Give out free food or candy in exchange.

In the past, some chapters have re-branded their Kognito Challenge (such as a “Game Simulation Marathon”) and distributed candy in a central area on campus as a way to draw students to their table and ask them to complete the simulation.

Incentivize with gift cards.

Several chapters are raffling off gift cards to participants. Participating chapters receive weekly user reports from Kognito, which can be used to randomly select prize winners.

Integrate the simulation into fall RA training or first-year experience/orientation.

Several schools have been working on incorporating the Kognito simulation into RA training and/or first-year experience/orientation. To count for the competition, each individual needs to complete the course, so it is recommended that they/orientation bring their own laptops to the training or attend part of the course in a computer lab.

Team up with professors to provide extra credit.

Professors in departments of psychology, social work, public health, and others may be interested in offering course credit to students who complete the simulation.

Incorporate it into your student org fair and other programming.

Last year, the University of Pittsburgh allowed participation in the Kognito Challenge to qualify students to be acknowledged as completing the chapter’s upcoming campus-wide mental health unity pledge.

There’s still plenty of time to get involved and train your peers to help students in distress! If you haven’t started yet, take the course today at www.activeminds.org/kognito and share it with students on campus before the free course expires on October 7!

Team up with your school’s marketing club.

find out if your campus marketing club would take on promoting the Challenge as a project.

Set weekly goals.

Set small, realistic weekly goals that will put you over the finish line. All you need are a few participants each week.

Organize a dorm night.

Organize a dorm night. Talk to RAs to help you schedule a few 30 minutes time-slots when people take the simulation in their room. Give out refreshments.

Contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org for support.

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Announcing the Winners of the Kognito Challenge! http://activemindsblog.org/announcing-the-winners-of-the-kognito-challenge/ Wed, 27 Apr 2016 13:33:27 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4775 Kognito_Challenge_Banner

Congratulations to the entire Active Minds chapter network for stepping up to the Kognito Challenge! Together, 108 participating schools reached more than 3,700 people via Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which was available for free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until yesterday, April 26.

Now that the competition has come to an end, it’s time to announce the winners!

40 schools completed the full Challenge, each training at least 20 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. The first 30 schools to complete the Challenge (see schools with the asterisk (*) on the official Challenge Leaderboard) earned a $250 credit toward their annual national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

The following three schools trained THE MOST people overall and have earned an additional fundraising credit:

  1. Active Minds at the University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC) trained 304 people.
  2. Active Minds at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) trained 256 people.
  3. Active Minds at Walsh University (North Canton, OH) trained 247 people.

Remarkably, the top three schools represent a diverse range in terms of the total number of students enrolled, and school size did not seem to impact the results of the competition. Active Minds at Walsh University alone reached more than 10% of their campus through the Challenge!

Students at Walsh University (North Canton, OH) take the Kognito Challenge as a class assignment.

Students at Walsh University take the Kognito Challenge as a class assignment.

Each of the top ten schools trained more than 90 people each on their campuses. Those schools include:

  • St. Cloud State University (St. Cloud, MN) – 209 people trained
  • Lindenwood University (St. Charles, MO) – 204 people trained
  • Gannon University (Erie, PA) – 169 people trained
  • Elmira College (Elmira, NY) – 119 people trained
  • University of North Alabama (Florence, AL) – 117 people trained
  • Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ) – 114 people trained
  • Coppin State University (Baltimore, MD) – 99 people trained

Active Minds chapters had a great time participating in the Challenge and reported incredible impact on their campuses.

Coppin State student participants with Dr. Katherine Cameron, Associate Professor of Psychology and Active Minds chapter advisor.

Coppin State University student participants with Dr. Katherine Cameron, Associate Professor of Psychology and Active Minds chapter advisor.

“Active Minds and the Kognito Challenge made a great pair,” said Wanda Parks, Chapter President and resident assistant at Coppin State University. “I believe it helped concretely move students to a successful model of what a student can do to help a friend.”

Students take the Kognito Challenge in a computer lab at Elmira College.

Students take the Kognito Challenge in a computer lab at Elmira College.

“[The Challenge] has reinvigorated our chapter at Elmira College and has gotten the whole campus talking about mental health awareness and stigma,” said Allyson Graf, chapter advisor at Elmira College.

Participants in the course completed a pre- and post-survey indicating their readiness to help a friend in distress. Percentage changes in the survey data will be provided to each participating school.

The University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall among the other participating schools, received early results of their survey feedback to support their efforts to bring Kognito’s training permanently to their campus.

Student completing the course at the University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall through the Kognito Challenge.

Student completing the course at the University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall through the Kognito Challenge.

Early results saw a significant increase in USC students’ reported preparedness to recognize signs of distress (pre: 49% vs. post: 90%), likelihood to discuss concerns with a student exhibiting symptoms (pre: 63% vs post: 98%), and confidence in their ability to help (pre: 70% vs post: 96%).

At least four USC faculty members made the training mandatory for their classes and one student officer of the Student Veterans Association even reported taking the course with their parent as they were also interested.

“[The training] was short but still educational and interactive,” said one USC student. “I wanted to listen to the narrator instead of just clicking through the program.”

Another USC student reported, “The best part of it was when I got to facilitate the conversation between the two friends by selecting responses and seeing where the conversation went from there. It was helpful to have that kind of practical mock experience.”

Congratulations to each participating chapter – together, you trained more than 3,700 students, faculty, and staff to help friends in distress nationwide!

Active Minds, Inc. would like to thank our generous partners at Kognito for making this opportunity available to all campuses with Active Minds chapters.

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Kognito Challenge Update: Save Lives and Raise Funds for Mental Health http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-update-save-lives-and-raise-funds-for-mental-health/ Wed, 30 Mar 2016 12:40:23 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4578 Kognito SM ImageWe’re only one week into the Kognito Challenge, but we are already seeing amazing results!

Overall, 85 schools have reached more than 1,200 students via Kognito’s At Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which is free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until April 26. The online, interactive experience teaches participants how to identify and assist students in distress.

As of the time this post was written, 18 schools had completed the full Challenge, each training at least 20 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. Those schools have earned a $250 credit toward their national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

There are still 12 spots left to become one of the first 30 schools to complete the Challenge and earn a fundraising credit. Here are a few creative approaches chapter members have taken to encourage participation:

UM Facebook Event1. Create a Facebook event for the Challenge and invite friends.

Active Minds at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and at the University of Pittsburgh have tapped into their social media networks to spread the word by creating Facebook events for the Challenge. The University of Michigan also created a short link for the training at bit.ly/kognito.

2. Send an e-mail to the school listserv.

Several schools have sent the Kognito simulation link to their campus listservs, inviting all students, staff, and faculty to complete the course

Jefferson Game Simulation3. Give out free food or candy in exchange.

Active Minds at Jefferson College re-branded their Kognito Challenge as a “Game Simulation Marathon” and distributed candy in a central area on campus as a way to draw students to their table and ask them to complete the simulation.

4. Incentivize with gift cards.

Several chapters are raffling off gift cards to participants. Contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org if you would like assistance with choosing recipients from the participant list.

Kognito SM Image 25. Require RAs to take the course as part of their spring training.

Active Mind at Cabrini College is working on incorporating the Kognito simulation into spring RA training. To count for the competition, each RA needs to complete the course, so it is recommended that RAs bring their own laptops to the training or attend part of the course in a computer lab.

6. Team up with professors to provide extra credit.

The Department of Psychology at the University of Alabama is offering course credit to students who complete the simulation.

7. Incorporate it into your other programming.

The University of Pittsburgh is allowing participation in the Kognito Challenge to qualify students to be acknowledged as completing the chapter’s upcoming campus-wide mental health unity pledge.

There’s still plenty of time to get involved and train your peers to help students in distress! If you haven’t started yet, take the course today and share it with students on campus before the free course expires on April 26!

Contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org for support.

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Kognito Challenge: Train Your Campus for FREE http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-train-your-campus-for-free/ Mon, 14 Mar 2016 10:37:12 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4424 Kognito-Facebook-1

We have exciting news! Active Minds is once again teaming up with Kognito —this time with an opportunity for chapters to earn fundraising credit up to $1,000 AND train students and faculty to support students in distress FOR FREE.

For a limited time only, March 21 through April 26, Active Minds chapters will have the opportunity to participate in a competition to get as many people as possible on campus to complete the At-Risk for Students training for FREE.

Prizes are as follows:

  • The first 30 chapters to (a) get their Advisor, Counseling Center Director or Associate Director AND (b) at least 20 students on their campus to take the At-Risk for Students training will receive a $250 credit toward their fundraising goal with Active Minds, Inc.
  • The chapter that gets THE MOST people trained will receive an additional $750 credit.
  • The second place chapter will win an additional $500 credit.
  • The third place chapter will win an additional $250 credit.

At-Risk for College Students is used by more than 400 colleges and universities, and is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), as well as in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s Best Practices Registry (SPRC BPR).

A longitudinal study of 270 students at 20 institutions of higher education that used Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students found a statistically significant increase in students’ motivation and skill to identify, approach, and refer fellow students. These increases remained statistically significant at three-month follow-up point.

The study also found that, as result of the simulation, students reported a statistically significant increase in the number of fellow students they connected with and referred to support services. It also found a significant increase in the likelihood that students who took the simulation would seek out help if they begin to experience psychological distress.

To learn more about the competition, visit www.activeminds.org/kognito.

To learn more about At-Risk for Students, visit www.kognito.com/products/highered.

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How To Have a Conversation That Can Save Somebody’s Life http://activemindsblog.org/how-to-have-a-conversation-that-can-save-somebodys-life/ Mon, 27 Oct 2014 11:26:52 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=1271 Flyer no keyI live in a town known for its great schools, low crime rate and beautiful homes.  It’s the kind of place where young people seem lucky to be who they are with everything in life to look forward to.

But earlier this year, we learned otherwise.  In the space of a couple of months, three young people committed suicide.  One was a high school senior.  The other two were in college.  It was a devastating wake-up call to how people can suffer invisibly right in your midst.

For parents, siblings, and close friends, this kind of loss was unspeakable and never ends.  For those of us who live in the community, these deaths raised an urgent understanding of how important it is to create bigger and stronger safety nets—and why it’s so important for us as a society to gain skills we need to talk about mental health.

That’s one reason why I am so glad that I work at Kognito, a company that has partnered with Active Minds to produce the online learning experience At-Risk for College Students.  

Through virtual humans and gaming technology, At-Risk for College Students  helps you learn how to recognize when a peer is in distress and how to approach him or her in a caring, tactful way.  The goal is to make sure that the person who is in need gets support and help before there is a crisis.

The program is a role-play simulation that gives you opportunities to practice what to say and do so that you can gain skills and confidence to have a conversation with a friend you are concerned about in real life.  The program is easy to use, it can be done 24/7 from anywhere with Internet access in only 30 minutes.  With this kind of easy access every student can gain “gatekeeper skills”—i.e. become gatekeepers to help–creating a safer and more supportive campus community.

Like all of Kognito’s programs, At Risk for College Students is based on extensive research in neuroscience, social cognition, and psychology.  It’s listed in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices.

It has been proven to work. In a 20-campus study of students who experienced At-Risk for College Students:

  • 70% of students increased the number of friends they approached to talk about mental health concerns
  • 95% of the students thought it would aid them in getting help for a fellow student and
  • 92% said they would recommend the course to a friend

Active Minds has arranged for all chapter leaders to be able to experience At-Risk for College Students at no cost until November 13.

Try At-Risk for College Studentsat activeminds.kognito.com with Enrollment Key activeminds2014.

Please take just 30 minutes to complete the program.  You’ll gain valuable skills that might even save someone’s life.  

Lisa Tannenbaum is the Chief Marketing Officer of Kognito.

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Active Minds and Kognito Partner to Bring Innovative Program to Campuses Nationwide http://activemindsblog.org/active-minds-and-kognito-partner-to-bring-innovative-program-to-campuses-nationwide/ Fri, 25 Apr 2014 20:02:57 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=93 KognitoLogo_orange-smactive_minds_logo_rgb
May 1, 2014 – (New York, NY) – Surveys show that roughly 80 percent of students who die by suicide had not sought services from their campus counseling centers and 30 percent of students report feeling so depressed that daily functioning was impaired.
To help colleges and universities better assist students experiencing psychological distress or thoughts of suicide, Active Minds and Kognito have teamed up to expand the adoption of At-Risk for College and University Students, an online, interactive and evidence-based immersive learning experience to campuses with Active Minds student chapters.

At-Risk for Students prepares students and student leaders to recognize when friends and fellow students exhibit signs of psychological distress and how to then motivate them to seek help through campus counseling services.

In the training, users enter a virtual environment and engage in a series of game- based, interactive exercises including a simulated conversation with a virtual student who is struggling with anxiety, depression and thoughts of suicide. Through role-play scenarios, users practice having challenging conversations surrounding mental health issues, gain skills in building motivation to seek help, and learning strategies to indentify, approach and then connect students for help.

“We know that students are most likely to turn to each other when they’re struggling and that mental health education is needed to ensure that they respond in empowering, helpful ways that connect their peers to needed services,” said Alison Malmon, founder of Active Minds. “Too often, students don’t know what to look for with regards to mental illness or suicide risk, and even if they do, they typically don’t know what to say to their friend or where they can turn to for help.”

At-Risk for Students was developed in collaboration with leading mental and behavioral health experts and is currently available to nearly 650 campuses across the U.S. The goal of this partnership is to further expand the use of At-Risk for Students to the more than 400 campuses with Active Minds chapters. Active Minds chapters serve as a powerful voice on their campuses and will help advocate for campus-wide adoption of the program to make it available to the entire student body. A portion of the proceeds will be directed by Active Minds to support its chapters.

At-Risk for Students was developed by Kognito in collaboration with leading mental and behavioral health experts and is currently available to nearly 750 campuses across the U.S. The goal of this partnership is to further expand the use of At-Risk for Students to the more than 400 campuses with Active Minds chapters. Active Minds chapters serve as a powerful voice on their campuses and will help advocate for campus-wide adoption of the program to make it available to the entire student body. A portion of the proceeds will be directed by Active Minds to support its chapters.

“This will help thousands of students learn more about mental illness and suicide risk, but more importantly develop the confidence necessary to help their peers, and ultimately save lives,” said Malmon.

“Vital to the effectiveness of the At-Risk suite of programs is that users can engage in hands-on practice conversations with virtual and fully-animated students that exhibit signs of psychological distress. This allows them to gain the self-efficacy and skills to engage in what can often be a very challenging conversation in real life and know how to best help their peer and friends get the help they need. Many students want to help their peers but are unsure of how to best broach the topic or manage the conversation,” said Ron Goldman, CEO of Kognito.

The online simulation has been included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP) as well as in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s Best Practices Registry (SPRC BPR). A longitudinal study of 270 students at 20 institutions of higher education found a statistically significant increase in student’s motivation and skill to identify, approach, and refer fellow students and that those increases remained statistically significant at three-month follow-up point. The study also found that as result of the training students reported a statistically significant increase in the number of fellow students they connected with and referred to support services. It also found a significant increase in the likelihood that users who took the simulation would seek out help if they begin to experience psychological distress.

To learn more about At-Risk for Students visit www.kognito.com/products/highered

About Active Minds: Active Minds is the young adult voice in mental health advocacy. By supporting a rapidly growing network of hundreds of student-led chapters at colleges and universities, Active Minds empowers students to speak openly about mental health in order to educate others and encourage help-seeking. Active Minds is a national nonprofit headquartered in Washington D.C. Follow us on Twitter @Active_Minds. For more information visit:www.ActiveMinds.org.

About Kognito: Founded in 2003, Kognito is a leader in immersive learning experiences that drive positive change in health behaviors. Kognito’s award-winning online and mobile simulations with virtual humans prepare individuals and professionals to effectively manage challenging conversations about health. Kognito uses a science-driven, research-proven approach and currently has more than 450 clients in education, government and healthcare settings. The company has been recognized for its evidence-based programs, and is the only company with online simulations listed in the National Registry of Evidence- Based Programs and Practices (NREPP). Learn more and access demos at http://www.kognito.com.

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