Laura Horne – Active Minds Blog http://activemindsblog.org Changing the conversation about mental health Mon, 10 Jul 2017 17:03:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Racism is Making Us Sick http://activemindsblog.org/racism-is-making-us-sick/ Fri, 05 May 2017 14:54:05 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=6608 Help and hope are available. Over the last 14 years, Active Minds has empowered students facing mental health struggles to share their stories to let others know they’re not alone and to spread that message: help and hope are available. During my time as a member of the Active Minds team, I’ve come to recognize that we and many of our peer organizations in the field share the same question: how do we ensure this empowerment is extended fully to students of color?

This past week, it was reported that a noose was found hanging in a fraternity house at the University of Maryland. This incident shortly followed a similarly despicable racist incident at American University.

There is a host of literature linking such instances of interpersonal racism to negative health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, distress, psychological stress, post-traumatic stress, and even biomarkers of disease, such as inflammatory markers, cortisol dysregulation, telomere length, and allostatic load.

This spring, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin published a study in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, in which they found a high prevalence of “imposter syndrome” among African American, Asian American, and Latino American college students – that is, a condition of feeling like a fraud because of an inability to internalize success and a feeling of incompetence – and that high imposter feelings were a positive predictor of anxiety and depression. In other words, the students’ awareness of racial prejudices and stereotypes (i.e. assumed lower intelligence among African American and Latino American students and “model minority” stereotypes of Asian American students) induced an imposter phenomenon and contributed to incidences of anxiety and depression.

In short, racism is making us sick.

Yet, despite all of this, research shows that students of color are less likely to seek help than their peers.

Last month, to help us better understand the broader context for which racism and health are interacting, a team of researchers from New York and Boston came together to point out in The Lancet that to truly reduce health inequities, we must be willing to address structural racism, involving “interconnected institutions, whose linkages are historically rooted and culturally reinforced.” Examples of structural racism impacting many of the students of color experiencing imposter syndrome and other forms of interpersonal racism include the failure by our university systems to consider mental health as a retention and graduation issue. Additionally, hiring and educational/training practices have produced counseling centers that are more often not “white spaces,” predominantly or sometimes exclusively staffed by counselors who neither reflect the diversity of their students nor are trained to help with often culturally-linked mental health concerns of students of color.

Not to mention the various examples of structural racism impacting students of color beyond the campus walls and in a range of disciplines and sectors, including but not limited to housing, employment and earnings, media, criminal justice, and so on.

We have a long way to go to ensure mental health services are inclusive of and utilized by students of color. I’m encouraged to see more public health professionals addressing racism head-on through their innovative research. Their work teaches us that we each have a role in applying that knowledge in our various sectors and communities.

To learn more about how to support the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color, seek out and get involved with one of the many organizations in the field working to empower students to speak openly about mental health and leading innovative mental health initiatives with a focus on diversity/inclusion. Some of these incredible organizations include Active Minds, Each Mind Matters, the Healthy Minds Network, and the Steve Fund. If you’re struggling, text BRAVE to 741741 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

A version of this post will also be published at The Activist History Review on May 5.

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Announcing the Winners of the Kognito Challenge! http://activemindsblog.org/announcing-the-winners-of-the-kognito-challenge-2/ Tue, 11 Oct 2016 16:08:14 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=5720 00002

Congratulations to the entire Active Minds chapter network for stepping up to the Kognito Challenge! Together, 97 participating schools reached more than 3,000 people in just four weeks via Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which was available for free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until Sunday, October 9.

Now that the competition has come to an end, it’s time to announce the winners!

20 schools completed the full Challenge, each training at least 50 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. Each of those schools (see schools in bold type on the official Challenge Leaderboard) earned a $250 credit toward their annual national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

The following three schools trained THE MOST people overall and have earned an additional fundraising credit:

  • The University of Texas at San Antonio trained 286 people.
  • Saint Cloud State University (Saint Cloud, MN) trained 222 people.
  • Stockton University (Pomona, NJ) trained 212 people.

“We already sense a difference in the campus climate towards mental health,” said UT San Antonio Chapter President Melina Acosta. “At least four instructors with multiple classes of 100+ offered extra credit to students who completed the challenge. We were also very plugged into the Student Government Association, so we were able to share the challenge with more student leaders on campus this go-around. Overall, networking with students and faculty and incentivizing the challenge really seemed to pay off.”

Remarkably, the top three schools represent a diverse range in terms of the total number of students enrolled, and school size did not seem to impact the results of the competition. Active Minds at Stockton University alone reached more than 2.5% of their campus through the Challenge!

Each of the top ten schools trained more than 90 people each on their campuses. Those schools include:

  • Northeastern University (Boston, MA) – trained 191 people
  • University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA) – trained 171 people
  • University of North Carolina at Asheville – trained 121 people
  • Austin Peay State University (Clarksville, TN) – trained 118 people
  • University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL) – trained 118 people
  • Coppin State University (Baltimore, MD) – trained 98 people
  • University of Memphis (Memphis, TN) – trained 94 people

Active Minds chapters had a great time participating in the Challenge and reported incredible impact on their campuses.

“We have loved this challenge! It fit perfectly into our Suicide Prevention efforts,” said Nathan Morell, Active Minds staff advisor at Stockton University. “We made it a mandatory part of our depression screener training as well as (with support from res life) had most of our RA’s take it.”

Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, TN, home to many military families stationed or retired from Fort Campbell, KY, also reported great success.

“Our veterans, reserve, national guard, ROTC, and Active Duty students enjoyed the Kognito Challenge and gained at of understanding and education from it,” said Chapter President Lauren Schores. “We networked [with] psychology, sociology, social work, and pre-professional health students.  We also spoke with peer mentoring, housing, disability services, and student life and engagement.”

Participants in the course completed a pre- and post-survey indicating their readiness to help a friend in distress. Percentage changes in the survey data will be provided to each school with at least 50 participants.

How to Earn a Second Fundraising Reward

Schools can now receive a second fundraising incentive by helping their school
leadership implement Kognito’s At-Risk simulations campus-wide. As an on-campus leader for mental health, you’re in a strong position to help your school understand the benefits and impact of Kognito’s At-Risk simulations as a frontline solution for improving emotional health..

Any chapter who successfully approaches their campus administration and gets them
to request a written pricing proposal for their school will receive an additional
award toward their chapter fundraising goal.

We will be talking to you more about how to earn this incentive in the coming weeks. In the meantime, please do not hesitate to reach out to Kognito at info@kognito.com. We are excited to host Kognito as a sponsor at the national conference in November and we look forward to seeing you there.

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KOGNITO CHALLENGE UPDATE: SAVE LIVES AND RAISE FUNDS FOR MENTAL HEALTH http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-update-save-lives-and-raise-funds-for-mental-health-2/ Mon, 19 Sep 2016 14:46:24 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=5539 00002

We’re two weeks into the Fall 2016 Kognito Challenge, and we are already seeing amazing results!

Overall, 65 schools have reached more than 600 students via Kognito’s At Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which is free to all schools with Active Minds chapters through October 7. The online, interactive experience teaches participants how to identify and assist students in distress.

This is the second Kognito Challenge. Collectively, Active Minds chapters have engaged more than 4,000 participants since the first Kognito Challenge in spring 2016.

As of the time this post was written, Austin Peay State University, Saint Cloud State University, and Stockton University, have completed and are leading the Challenge, each training more than 55 students, faculty, and staff. The first 40 chapters to engage at least 50 students and 1 faculty or staff member to complete the full simulation will receive $250 credit toward their national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

There’s still plenty of time to join in and compete to win! Here are a few creative approaches chapter members have taken to encourage participation:

Take pictures of students completing the simulation.

Pictures are worth 1,000 words. Take pictures of people completing the challenge and post on social media.

Promote the Challenge on social media.

Build an army one step at a time. Gather a team of a few people to help you spread the word. Or, ask one person to tell a friend, to tell a friend, to tell a friend. Active Minds at Austin Peay State University, University of Texas at San Antonio, and others have tapped into their social media networks to spread the word via social media for the Challenge.3

Use school resources.

Several schools have sent the Kognito simulation link to their campus listservs, inviting all students, staff, and faculty to complete the course. Talk to your school newspaper, radio station, social media team and announcers at sporting events about helping you promote the challenge.

Give out free food or candy in exchange.

In the past, some chapters have re-branded their Kognito Challenge (such as a “Game Simulation Marathon”) and distributed candy in a central area on campus as a way to draw students to their table and ask them to complete the simulation.

Incentivize with gift cards.

Several chapters are raffling off gift cards to participants. Participating chapters receive weekly user reports from Kognito, which can be used to randomly select prize winners.

Integrate the simulation into fall RA training or first-year experience/orientation.

Several schools have been working on incorporating the Kognito simulation into RA training and/or first-year experience/orientation. To count for the competition, each individual needs to complete the course, so it is recommended that they/orientation bring their own laptops to the training or attend part of the course in a computer lab.

Team up with professors to provide extra credit.

Professors in departments of psychology, social work, public health, and others may be interested in offering course credit to students who complete the simulation.

Incorporate it into your student org fair and other programming.

Last year, the University of Pittsburgh allowed participation in the Kognito Challenge to qualify students to be acknowledged as completing the chapter’s upcoming campus-wide mental health unity pledge.

There’s still plenty of time to get involved and train your peers to help students in distress! If you haven’t started yet, take the course today at www.activeminds.org/kognito and share it with students on campus before the free course expires on October 7!

Team up with your school’s marketing club.

find out if your campus marketing club would take on promoting the Challenge as a project.

Set weekly goals.

Set small, realistic weekly goals that will put you over the finish line. All you need are a few participants each week.

Organize a dorm night.

Organize a dorm night. Talk to RAs to help you schedule a few 30 minutes time-slots when people take the simulation in their room. Give out refreshments.

Contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org for support.

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Happy Anniversary to these Chapters! http://activemindsblog.org/happy-anniversary-to-these-chapters-2/ Wed, 07 Sep 2016 13:46:34 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=5455 Chapter_Anni_10_Year_2016-17_FB

Happy anniversary to 34 chapters in our network celebrating 5 or 10 year anniversaries of stigmafighting of this school year!

The following chapters have been fighting stigma for TEN YEARS as of this school year:

  • University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • University of Southern California
  • Montclair State University

Additionally, 31 chapters have been fighting stigma for FIVE YEARS as of this school year:

  • Jacksonville State University
  • Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Washington and Lee University
  • University of Indianapolis
  • Tompkins Cortland Community College
  • University of Iowa
  • Pacific University
  • Buffalo State College
  • Rhode Island College
  • Brock University
  • Concordia College
  • State University of New York at Oswego
  • Riverside City College
  • Marriotts Ridge High School
  • Arizona State University
  • Johnson County Community College
  • Neumann University
  • Washington University in Saint Louis
  • Bridgewater College
  • University of Cincinnati
  • University of Wisconsin at Parkside
  • University of Minnesota at Duluth
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Wesleyan University
  • Georgia Southern University
  • Mount Hebron High School
  • Simmons College
  • Susquehanna University
  • College of the Desert
  • Mercer University
  • North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Congratulations, chapters, on these incredible milestones! Thank you for all of your great work to further our mission and movement to change the conversation about mental health on campuses across the globe!

Your chapter anniversary is particularly meaningful to celebrate on your own campus and an opportunity to renew chapter bonding, pride, and appreciation for the chapter’s history. Check out our ideas for celebrating your anniversary and contact us at chapters@activeminds.org if you’re curious about your own chapter’s registration date.

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Kognito Challenge: Train Your Campus for FREE http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-train-your-campus-for-free-2/ Wed, 31 Aug 2016 13:00:55 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=5434 Kognito_Challenge_2016_FB

Exciting news, stigmafighters! Active Minds is once again teaming up with Kognito to bring you the Kognito Challenge this fall.

For a limited time only, September 6 through October 7, Active Minds chapters will have the opportunity to participate in a competition to get as many people as possible on campus to complete the At-Risk for Students gatekeeper simulation for FREE.

Prizes are as follows:

  • The first 40 chapters to at least 50 students on their campus plus a faculty/staff member to take the At-Risk for Students training will receive a $250 credit toward their fundraising goal with Active Minds, Inc.
  • The chapter that gets THE MOST people trained will receive an additional $750 credit.
  • The second place chapter will win an additional $500 credit.
  • The third place chapter will win an additional $250 credit.

This is the second semester Active Minds and Kognito have offered the Kognito Challenge. Last spring, 108 schools participated, reaching more than 3,700 people in one month. The top three schools, University of South Carolina, Northeastern University, and Walsh University, represented a diverse range in terms of total enrollment. Read more about last year’s Challenge and the results.

At-Risk for College Students is used by more than 400 colleges and universities, and is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), as well as in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s Best Practices Registry (SPRC BPR).

A longitudinal study of 270 students at 20 institutions of higher education that used Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students found a statistically significant increase in students’ motivation and skill to identify, approach, and refer fellow students. These increases remained statistically significant at three-month follow-up point.

The study also found that, as result of the simulation, students reported a statistically significant increase in the number of fellow students they connected with and referred to support services. It also found a significant increase in the likelihood that students who took the simulation would seek out help if they begin to experience psychological distress.

To learn more about the competition, visit www.activeminds.org/kognito.

To learn more about At-Risk for Students, visit www.kognito.com/products/highered.

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Announcing the Winners of the Kognito Challenge! http://activemindsblog.org/announcing-the-winners-of-the-kognito-challenge/ Wed, 27 Apr 2016 13:33:27 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4775 Kognito_Challenge_Banner

Congratulations to the entire Active Minds chapter network for stepping up to the Kognito Challenge! Together, 108 participating schools reached more than 3,700 people via Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which was available for free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until yesterday, April 26.

Now that the competition has come to an end, it’s time to announce the winners!

40 schools completed the full Challenge, each training at least 20 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. The first 30 schools to complete the Challenge (see schools with the asterisk (*) on the official Challenge Leaderboard) earned a $250 credit toward their annual national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

The following three schools trained THE MOST people overall and have earned an additional fundraising credit:

  1. Active Minds at the University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC) trained 304 people.
  2. Active Minds at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) trained 256 people.
  3. Active Minds at Walsh University (North Canton, OH) trained 247 people.

Remarkably, the top three schools represent a diverse range in terms of the total number of students enrolled, and school size did not seem to impact the results of the competition. Active Minds at Walsh University alone reached more than 10% of their campus through the Challenge!

Students at Walsh University (North Canton, OH) take the Kognito Challenge as a class assignment.
Students at Walsh University take the Kognito Challenge as a class assignment.

Each of the top ten schools trained more than 90 people each on their campuses. Those schools include:

  • St. Cloud State University (St. Cloud, MN) – 209 people trained
  • Lindenwood University (St. Charles, MO) – 204 people trained
  • Gannon University (Erie, PA) – 169 people trained
  • Elmira College (Elmira, NY) – 119 people trained
  • University of North Alabama (Florence, AL) – 117 people trained
  • Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ) – 114 people trained
  • Coppin State University (Baltimore, MD) – 99 people trained

Active Minds chapters had a great time participating in the Challenge and reported incredible impact on their campuses.

Coppin State student participants with Dr. Katherine Cameron, Associate Professor of Psychology and Active Minds chapter advisor.
Coppin State University student participants with Dr. Katherine Cameron, Associate Professor of Psychology and Active Minds chapter advisor.

“Active Minds and the Kognito Challenge made a great pair,” said Wanda Parks, Chapter President and resident assistant at Coppin State University. “I believe it helped concretely move students to a successful model of what a student can do to help a friend.”

Students take the Kognito Challenge in a computer lab at Elmira College.
Students take the Kognito Challenge in a computer lab at Elmira College.

“[The Challenge] has reinvigorated our chapter at Elmira College and has gotten the whole campus talking about mental health awareness and stigma,” said Allyson Graf, chapter advisor at Elmira College.

Participants in the course completed a pre- and post-survey indicating their readiness to help a friend in distress. Percentage changes in the survey data will be provided to each participating school.

The University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall among the other participating schools, received early results of their survey feedback to support their efforts to bring Kognito’s training permanently to their campus.

Student completing the course at the University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall through the Kognito Challenge.
Student completing the course at the University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall through the Kognito Challenge.

Early results saw a significant increase in USC students’ reported preparedness to recognize signs of distress (pre: 49% vs. post: 90%), likelihood to discuss concerns with a student exhibiting symptoms (pre: 63% vs post: 98%), and confidence in their ability to help (pre: 70% vs post: 96%).

At least four USC faculty members made the training mandatory for their classes and one student officer of the Student Veterans Association even reported taking the course with their parent as they were also interested.

“[The training] was short but still educational and interactive,” said one USC student. “I wanted to listen to the narrator instead of just clicking through the program.”

Another USC student reported, “The best part of it was when I got to facilitate the conversation between the two friends by selecting responses and seeing where the conversation went from there. It was helpful to have that kind of practical mock experience.”

Congratulations to each participating chapter – together, you trained more than 3,700 students, faculty, and staff to help friends in distress nationwide!

Active Minds, Inc. would like to thank our generous partners at Kognito for making this opportunity available to all campuses with Active Minds chapters.

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Meet the 2016-2017 Student Advisory Committee http://activemindsblog.org/meet-the-2016-2017-student-advisory-committee/ Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:03:49 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4591 Each spring, Active Minds, Inc. welcomes new members to the Student Advisory Committee (SAC), a group of up to 20 students from across the country who have shown extraordinary leadership and dedication to Active Minds. The SAC serves as an advisory body to the national office staff and brings the student perspective to organizational decision-making.

Read on to meet the 2016-2017 Student Advisory Committee!

Melina Acosta

School: University of TeMelinaxas at San Antonio (San Antonio, TX)
Studies: Psychology, Statistics
Fun Fact: Melina loves HGTV – she’s obsessed with houses and would love to flip one!

 


Emily Ahlin

School: University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburg, PA)
Studies: Political Science, Russian/Eastern European studies
Fun Fact: Her favorite color is yellow and although her favorite book series will always be Harry Potter, her favorite book is The Book Thief  by Markus Zusak.

Erica Cooke

ericaSchool: Bridgewater College (Bridgewater, VA)
Studies: Psychology, Neuroscience and German
Fun Fact: Erica is currently working on her minor in GERMANY!

 

Russell Fascione

Fascione_Russell

School: University of Maine (Orono, ME)
Studies: Psychology, Disability Studies
Fun Fact: Russell has been active in UMaine’s LGBTQ community, and he is a huge nerd for educational trainings, workshops, and presentations of all kinds.

    

Nycole Fassbender

School: Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI)
Studies: Criminology and Psychology
Fun Fact: When she isn’t advocating or doing school work Nycole loves to explore new places, enjoy a run, and get her caffeine coffee fix.

 

Allison Friske

Allison Friske

School: University of Rochester (Rochester, NY)
Studies: Psychology and English, minor in Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Fun Fact: Allison is currently in England, studying abroad at the University of Sussex!

 

Rae Gerber

Rae Gerber
School: Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR)
Studies: Psychology, Nutrition and Public Health
Fun Fact: In Rae’s free time you can find her on a horse, running outside, drawing, or taking a nap with her cat, Osteo.

 

Taylor Grant

Taylor_GrantSchool: Florida Gulf Coast University (Fort Myers, FL)
Studies: Psychology
Fun Fact: If she could be a guest star on any TV show, she would choose The Oprah Winfrey show because she is insightful and an inspiration to other women to be progressive in society!

 

Kristina Keidel

Kristina Kiedel

School: Denison University (Granville, OH)
Studies: Psychology and Communication
Fun Fact: She is also a proud member of a sorority and likes baking sweets!

Matt Kridel

Matt-Kridel-Copy

School: University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL)

Studies: Clinical/Counseling PhD Program
Fun Fact: Matt loves watching and participating in theatre and various musical pursuits. He’s also an Active Minds Emerging Scholar!

Megan Larson

Larson_Megan

School: University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA)
Studies: Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics with a minor in Study of Religion
Fun Fact: When she’s not advocating for mental health awareness, you can find Megan practicing archery to defend her national title, knitting in her Stitch onesie, and speaking in the British accent she picked up while studying abroad.

Tara Maestas

Tara Maestas

School: Colorado School of Mines (Golden, CO)
Studies: Biochemical Engineering
Fun Fact: When she is not studying or participating in soccer, archery, or school clubs, she volunteers at elementary schools and develops recycling programs.

 


Tracia Rochelle

ROCHELLE Tracia

School: CSU Sacramento (Sacramento, CA)
Studies: Social Work Master’s Program
Fun Fact: Tracia was born in Pakistan! In her free time, she likes to work out and go on hikes, as she is a major advocate for self-care and loves the outdoors.

 

 

 

Carly Stewart

Carley Stewart

School: Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN)
Studies: Psychology and Medicine, Health, and Society
Fun Fact: If she could guest star on a TV show, she would choose Grey’s Anatomy because she feels like she’s made an emotional connection with the characters and also Patrick Dempsey is beautiful.

 

     

Sara Treptow

Sara treptowSchool: San Diego State University (San Diego, CA)

Studies: Psychology and Counseling & Social Change

Fun Fact: She has enjoyed working with teenagers with mental disabilities, being a Peer Educator, and her job as an elementary school assistant teacher.

 

Elizabeth Williams

Elizabeth Williams

School: University of Alaska (Anchorage, AK)
Studies: Social Work
Fun Fact: In addition to Active Minds, Elizabeth leads monthly suicide prevention trainings for students. She loves wedding dresses and “Say Yes to the Dress.”

 

 

 

Cody Winston

WINSTON_Cody

School: Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY)
Studies: Applied Arts and Sciences, minor in Communications
Fun Fact: Cody’s academic program is a combination of civil engineering, marketing, and communications. He likes the show “Mr. Robot,” because “its one of only a few shows that I’ve watched that every character actually felt like they could be real.”


Jessica York

Jessica York

School: University of Missouri (Columbia, MO)
Studies: Nursing
Fun Fact: Jessica participates in Mizzou’s student government and alternative spring break program. She also enjoys binge-watching shows on Netflix, hiking, and spending time with her golden retriever.

 

 

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Kognito Challenge Update: Save Lives and Raise Funds for Mental Health http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-update-save-lives-and-raise-funds-for-mental-health/ Wed, 30 Mar 2016 12:40:23 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4578 Kognito SM ImageWe’re only one week into the Kognito Challenge, but we are already seeing amazing results!

Overall, 85 schools have reached more than 1,200 students via Kognito’s At Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which is free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until April 26. The online, interactive experience teaches participants how to identify and assist students in distress.

As of the time this post was written, 18 schools had completed the full Challenge, each training at least 20 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. Those schools have earned a $250 credit toward their national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

There are still 12 spots left to become one of the first 30 schools to complete the Challenge and earn a fundraising credit. Here are a few creative approaches chapter members have taken to encourage participation:

UM Facebook Event1. Create a Facebook event for the Challenge and invite friends.

Active Minds at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and at the University of Pittsburgh have tapped into their social media networks to spread the word by creating Facebook events for the Challenge. The University of Michigan also created a short link for the training at bit.ly/kognito.

2. Send an e-mail to the school listserv.

Several schools have sent the Kognito simulation link to their campus listservs, inviting all students, staff, and faculty to complete the course

Jefferson Game Simulation3. Give out free food or candy in exchange.

Active Minds at Jefferson College re-branded their Kognito Challenge as a “Game Simulation Marathon” and distributed candy in a central area on campus as a way to draw students to their table and ask them to complete the simulation.

4. Incentivize with gift cards.

Several chapters are raffling off gift cards to participants. Contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org if you would like assistance with choosing recipients from the participant list.

Kognito SM Image 25. Require RAs to take the course as part of their spring training.

Active Mind at Cabrini College is working on incorporating the Kognito simulation into spring RA training. To count for the competition, each RA needs to complete the course, so it is recommended that RAs bring their own laptops to the training or attend part of the course in a computer lab.

6. Team up with professors to provide extra credit.

The Department of Psychology at the University of Alabama is offering course credit to students who complete the simulation.

7. Incorporate it into your other programming.

The University of Pittsburgh is allowing participation in the Kognito Challenge to qualify students to be acknowledged as completing the chapter’s upcoming campus-wide mental health unity pledge.

There’s still plenty of time to get involved and train your peers to help students in distress! If you haven’t started yet, take the course today and share it with students on campus before the free course expires on April 26!

Contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org for support.

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Kognito Challenge: Train Your Campus for FREE http://activemindsblog.org/kognito-challenge-train-your-campus-for-free/ Mon, 14 Mar 2016 10:37:12 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4424 Kognito-Facebook-1

We have exciting news! Active Minds is once again teaming up with Kognito —this time with an opportunity for chapters to earn fundraising credit up to $1,000 AND train students and faculty to support students in distress FOR FREE.

For a limited time only, March 21 through April 26, Active Minds chapters will have the opportunity to participate in a competition to get as many people as possible on campus to complete the At-Risk for Students training for FREE.

Prizes are as follows:

  • The first 30 chapters to (a) get their Advisor, Counseling Center Director or Associate Director AND (b) at least 20 students on their campus to take the At-Risk for Students training will receive a $250 credit toward their fundraising goal with Active Minds, Inc.
  • The chapter that gets THE MOST people trained will receive an additional $750 credit.
  • The second place chapter will win an additional $500 credit.
  • The third place chapter will win an additional $250 credit.

At-Risk for College Students is used by more than 400 colleges and universities, and is listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), as well as in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s Best Practices Registry (SPRC BPR).

A longitudinal study of 270 students at 20 institutions of higher education that used Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students found a statistically significant increase in students’ motivation and skill to identify, approach, and refer fellow students. These increases remained statistically significant at three-month follow-up point.

The study also found that, as result of the simulation, students reported a statistically significant increase in the number of fellow students they connected with and referred to support services. It also found a significant increase in the likelihood that students who took the simulation would seek out help if they begin to experience psychological distress.

To learn more about the competition, visit www.activeminds.org/kognito.

To learn more about At-Risk for Students, visit www.kognito.com/products/highered.

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Chapters: What Does Your Fundraising Money Support? http://activemindsblog.org/chapters-what-does-your-fundraising-money-support/ Mon, 08 Feb 2016 14:35:37 +0000 http://activemindsblog.org/?p=4262 400pluschaptersThe Active Minds network is growing rapidly! On average, we are opening five new chapters a week and fielding requests from many others working on joining in the near future.

In order to support our increasing number of chapters and expansive programs and ensure the future and success of our mission, we need everyone’s help.

When you support Active Minds, you are helping to bring mental health education, resources and training opportunities to 2.3 million students (and counting!).

Thank you for supporting these life-saving efforts that help change the conversation about mental health across the globe. Check out our new infographic below for more details.

Impact_2014-15_Final

 

Want to help continue the Active Minds national movement? Get started at www.activeminds.org/fundraising and contact the Chapters Team at chapters@activeminds.org for assistance.

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