Chapters 101

Announcing the Winners of the Kognito Challenge!

Kognito_Challenge_Banner

Congratulations to the entire Active Minds chapter network for stepping up to the Kognito Challenge! Together, 108 participating schools reached more than 3,700 people via Kognito’s At-Risk for College Students mental health simulation, which was available for free to all schools with Active Minds chapters until yesterday, April 26.

Now that the competition has come to an end, it’s time to announce the winners!

40 schools completed the full Challenge, each training at least 20 students plus their Active Minds chapter advisor or Counseling Center Director. The first 30 schools to complete the Challenge (see schools with the asterisk (*) on the official Challenge Leaderboard) earned a $250 credit toward their annual national fundraising goal for mental health awareness and the Active Minds movement.

The following three schools trained THE MOST people overall and have earned an additional fundraising credit:

  1. Active Minds at the University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC) trained 304 people.
  2. Active Minds at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) trained 256 people.
  3. Active Minds at Walsh University (North Canton, OH) trained 247 people.

Remarkably, the top three schools represent a diverse range in terms of the total number of students enrolled, and school size did not seem to impact the results of the competition. Active Minds at Walsh University alone reached more than 10% of their campus through the Challenge!

Students at Walsh University (North Canton, OH) take the Kognito Challenge as a class assignment.
Students at Walsh University take the Kognito Challenge as a class assignment.

Each of the top ten schools trained more than 90 people each on their campuses. Those schools include:

  • St. Cloud State University (St. Cloud, MN) – 209 people trained
  • Lindenwood University (St. Charles, MO) – 204 people trained
  • Gannon University (Erie, PA) – 169 people trained
  • Elmira College (Elmira, NY) – 119 people trained
  • University of North Alabama (Florence, AL) – 117 people trained
  • Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ) – 114 people trained
  • Coppin State University (Baltimore, MD) – 99 people trained

Active Minds chapters had a great time participating in the Challenge and reported incredible impact on their campuses.

Coppin State student participants with Dr. Katherine Cameron, Associate Professor of Psychology and Active Minds chapter advisor.
Coppin State University student participants with Dr. Katherine Cameron, Associate Professor of Psychology and Active Minds chapter advisor.

“Active Minds and the Kognito Challenge made a great pair,” said Wanda Parks, Chapter President and resident assistant at Coppin State University. “I believe it helped concretely move students to a successful model of what a student can do to help a friend.”

Students take the Kognito Challenge in a computer lab at Elmira College.
Students take the Kognito Challenge in a computer lab at Elmira College.

“[The Challenge] has reinvigorated our chapter at Elmira College and has gotten the whole campus talking about mental health awareness and stigma,” said Allyson Graf, chapter advisor at Elmira College.

Participants in the course completed a pre- and post-survey indicating their readiness to help a friend in distress. Percentage changes in the survey data will be provided to each participating school.

The University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall among the other participating schools, received early results of their survey feedback to support their efforts to bring Kognito’s training permanently to their campus.

Student completing the course at the University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall through the Kognito Challenge.
Student completing the course at the University of South Carolina, which trained the most people overall through the Kognito Challenge.

Early results saw a significant increase in USC students’ reported preparedness to recognize signs of distress (pre: 49% vs. post: 90%), likelihood to discuss concerns with a student exhibiting symptoms (pre: 63% vs post: 98%), and confidence in their ability to help (pre: 70% vs post: 96%).

At least four USC faculty members made the training mandatory for their classes and one student officer of the Student Veterans Association even reported taking the course with their parent as they were also interested.

“[The training] was short but still educational and interactive,” said one USC student. “I wanted to listen to the narrator instead of just clicking through the program.”

Another USC student reported, “The best part of it was when I got to facilitate the conversation between the two friends by selecting responses and seeing where the conversation went from there. It was helpful to have that kind of practical mock experience.”

Congratulations to each participating chapter – together, you trained more than 3,700 students, faculty, and staff to help friends in distress nationwide!

Active Minds, Inc. would like to thank our generous partners at Kognito for making this opportunity available to all campuses with Active Minds chapters.